Out-of-Service Stats and States

By on February 9, 2010
RoadKing Mag

Throughout each year, motor carrier safety officials carry out inspections on interstate trucks and drivers. Vehicles can be placed “out of service” when, by reason of mechanical condition or loading, they would likely cause an accident or breakdown.
Drivers can be placed out of service for violating the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Hours-Of-Service regulations. These place specific limits on the amount of time a driver can drive a commercial motor vehicle, and how many total hours a driver can work each day and each week.

The top 10 states with the highest out-of-service rates for interstate trucks last year were, in order:
- Nebraska
- Connecticut
- Utah
- Colorado
- Missouri
- Arizona
- Idaho
- Delaware
- Louisiana
- Wyoming

The top 10 states with the highest out-of-service rates for drivers, in order, were:
- Oregon
- Connecticut
- Arizona
- Wyoming
- Utah
- Minnesota
- Idaho
- Georgia
- Maine
- Arkansas

What I’m curious about is this: Are these states more aggressive in their inspection of vehicles and drivers, or are fleets that operate in and through these states paying less attention to their vehicles and drivers?

About Road King

For the professional Driver

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>